net art, video, performance

Annie Abrahams

Addictive Behaviours – interview

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For the new Furtherfield website’s “debate” section Ruth Catlow and Marc Garrett asked me to reflect on the limits and potentials of art and human agency in the context of increased global automation.

Addictive Behaviours: Interview with Artist Annie Abrahams

Triggered by their questions I talked about the difficulty to describe my artistic work in institutional contexts and how in a conversation with a friend I tried to explain my interest in Agency Art. Using this term means being able to make cross sections through disciplines and opening up closed domains of practice. I also talk about a lack of res-ponsability in online affect management and my mistrust in the influence of algorithms produced by  machines themselves.

The interview is part of an editorial series, alongside the Are We All Addicts Now? exhibition, book, symposium and event series at Furtherfield.
Are We All Addicts Now? Is an artist research project led by Katriona Beales.

In the same series there is also a delicious prose-poem-hex from artist and poet Francesca da Rimini (aka doll yoko, GashGirl, liquid_nation, Fury) who traces a timeline of network seduction, imaginative production and addictive spaces from early Muds and Moos.

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Filed under: Articles / Texts, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

An organic acceptance of silence?

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liminal space – pure motion – an intimate regard – a field of light – dissolved, destabilized – an altered state – a telematic embrace – a silent small reprieve – hanging out with friends – machines conversing across the network only when the noisy humans finally shut up

This was the first time we (Daniel Pinheiro, Lisa Parra and Annie Abrahams) invited people to join us in our online performance experiment Distant Feeling(s) #3. The performance was projected as part of the festival Visions in the Nunnery gallery (London).
After the performance the surprise was great when, in the video, I saw the silent faces of others joining us for a shorter or longer time.

How does it feel to share an interface with eyes closed and no talking?

How did it feel?

When you participated, when you took the time to connect and join, you tried to feel the others and became more and more concentrated on being in a liminal space.

Watching the projection or the video, you could see this concentration, these faces who more and more descended into “pure motion”; these faces that abandonned real space and got elsewhere – you were allowed an intimate “regard”.

Here is my reaction (e-mail to Daniel and Lisa) just after the performance : “Felt “lost” – disturbed by the idea that there were “sneekers, peekers – disturbed also by my own curiosity, by my wish to see who was there and how they looked with closed eyes.
I felt light, as if I were in a field of light, changing, living light, not with human beings, and probably because that frightened me I tried to visualize you both, to imagine, how, where you were, I tried to make something I could understand of what I felt – as if you were familiar to me – I never met you – but still, apparently you became reassuring, close.
When I opened my eyes, everything became normal, just people, nice people around me on a screen. They have become more familiar now too. Looking at the screenshots of this session I feel grateful for their presence (they made the light).

Disolved I felt.
Maybe even empty. Certainly destabilised.
This may sound mystic, but in fact it might have been a very concrete experience – just the light flickering of the in- and out-going participants shimmering through my eyelids provoking an altered state?”

This is Randall Packer‘s reaction to it in a facebook discussion afterwards : “It was wonderfull – Like your work The Kiss, or Paul Sermon’s telematic pieces, the sensation of intimacy is never “real,” it is based on the willingness to believe and to allow closeness to become “real” despite separation. For those who participated in this experiment, it was exactly that: the willingness to suspend one’s belief in the knowledge of the virtual proximity and connectiveness of the others. It is that knowledge that can can be convincing enough to suspend disbelief and thus be silently wrapped in the telematic embrace. This work is a great model for how we might conduct ourselves on the Internet.”

Johannes Birringer on the same occasion. “I was waiting for silence to fall, after the chatter. when it occured, there was no embrace. but a faint sensation of sharing a silent small reprieve, over the constant noise and anger of the world, but an alonesilence as one could not see the others. it is the strangest experience, to be alonesilentblind with assumed others somewhere out there.”

And Nicolaas Schmidt called it “hanging out with friends…”.

Ruth Catlow, who was among the public at the Nunnery remarked : “Was it machine feedback… that mechanical clicking and beeping? The machines conversing across the network only when the noisy humans finally shut up! Like the toys that come alive in the magic toyshop when the children are asleep. I wanted it to get louder and louder till the whole world rang out- WE MACHINES ARE HERE AND WE ARE COMMUNICATING!
To what Randall reacted : “I love your observation that once the network is silenced of human conversation, all that is left is the hum of networked devices, the “nervous system” of the Net.”

Daniel Pinheiro compiled more reactions on Landproject.

On January 16th 2017, Muriel Piqué watched the video and wrote :

Silence / Silence
Je fouille l’image du silence / I explore the image of silence
Des têtes se tournent lentement / Heads turn slowly
8’44 un chien aboie au loin / 8’44 a dog barks far off
Je lis la résistance des corps à l’immobilité / I read the resistance of bodies to immobility
Je ressens l’acceptation organique du silence / I feel the organic acceptance of silence

And all the time the machines kept talking, exchanging data, making noise …

Some time ago I watched an interview by Gretta Louw with Sandra Danilovic in Second Life. They talk, among others, about our readiness to relate to an avatar in a bodily and emotional way. Why? Is there an evolutionary base for that? Sandra states, that, in our subconcious, we don’t percieve the self as an atomised individual identity, that precognitively we percieve the environment as a part of ourselves. Would such a thought be helpfull to understand better what happens? And is it true?

Filed under: networked performance, Performance, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Stranger Collaborations – London Art Fair.

18 – 22 January 2017,
London Art Fair, the Art Projects Screening Room,
Stranger Collaborations.
Curation Pryle Behrman.

Artists in the show:
Annie Abrahams (Angry Women Take 2), Émilie Brout & Maxime Marion (Glitter), Ruth Catlow (Time Is Speeding Up), Liz Sterry (Drinking Alone) and Michael Szpakowski (Shit Happens in Vegas).

Stranger Collaborations is an exhibition featuring artworks that in some way wouldn’t have been possible without the collaborations formed via the internet, showing how strangers can, sometimes even unknowingly, create an artistic partnership online.

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Liz Sterry, ‘Drinking Alone with the Internet, Star Wars Edition, Take 1’.

The artworks of Annie Abrahams and Liz Sterry create temporary communities that are ‘safe spaces’ in which socially-proscribed behaviours – such as public anger or private alcohol consumption – are accepted and even embraced. Mark Westall, short interview of Pryle Behrman in Fadmagazine.

What to see at the London Art Fair 2017? Art Fund_  Jan 11.

Filed under: Exhibition, Video, , , , , , ,

Press Release CyPosium – the book

New Book Explores Live Performance on the Internet

A new book exploring the field of cyberformance – live performance events that connect remote participants via the internet – offers a variety of perspectives on this multi-disciplinary live art form.

CyPosium – the book has been edited by Annie Abrahams and Helen Varley Jamieson.
Its contributors are Adriene Jenik, Alan Sondheim, Alberto Vazquez, Annie Abrahams, Auriea Harvey and Michaël Samyn, Cherry Truluck, Clara Gomes, Helen Varley Jamieson, James Cunningham, Joseph DeLappe, Liz Bryce, Maria Chatzichristodoulou, Maja Delak and Luka Prinčič, Miljana Perić, Rob Myers, Roger Mills, Ruth Catlow, Stephen A. Schrum and Suzon Fuks.

CyPosium – the book is published by Link Editions, in partnership with La Panacée, Montpellier, as part of “Open”, a series of catalogues, essay collections and pamphlets co-published with partner institutions. It is available as a print-on-demand paperback, e-book and downloadable PDF.

CyPosium – the book presents selected material from the CyPosium, a one-day online symposium organised in October 2012 to discuss cyberformance. Artists from a range of backgrounds have experimented in this field for as long as they have had access to the internet, and the CyPosium sought to remember and celebrate some of this ephemeral and pioneering work.The 12-hour event consisted of online presentations and facilitated discussions, and attracted an audience from around the world who engaged in a lively, vibrant real-time conversation.
CyPosium – the book continues and expands on this discussion by presenting texts, chat log excerpts, discussion transcripts, edited email conversations, creative chat excerpt essays and illustrations from the event, along with responses to the event.

CyPosium – the book will be of interest to practitioners, students and researchers of digital and online arts. While its focus is live performance, the contributors hail from a wide range of practice both online and offline, and their writing illustrates the hybrid nature of contemporary arts involving digital technologies. Music, dance, poetry, sound art and the visual arts all feature, as well as entertainment and social practices such as computer games, virtual worlds and online dating. Common themes that emerged during the CyPosium are also present in the book, such as the changing role of the audience; intimacy in the online environment; and mortality. This breadth of form and content reflects the ever-increasing ubiquity of the internet and digital technologies in our daily lives as well as our arts practices.

Order your copy via Lulu or Amazon: linkeditions.tumblr.com/cyposium

Read the ebook on issuu

Downloadable PDF on linkartcenter.eu

For further information contact:
Helen Varley Jamieson ( helenatcreative-catalyst.com ) and / or Annie Abrahams ( bram.orgatgmail.com )CyPosium_the_book

Filed under: Event, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A dark mirror from Paik to Abrahams and Deck Oh Yeah!

For us the most interesting of Paik’s contemporary artistic cousins demonstrate that technology and art are both not only mirrors for reflecting back reality, but also hammers for shaping and, perhaps, compost for seeding it. That is, its objects, its infrastructure, visions, behaviors, and relations; these things are about us understanding the world and shaping it. They all point to a new understanding of individual, collective, and species level agency as artists and tool makers in this network of things.

Ruth Catlow in a transcription of her speech (pdf)The Future Is Now: Media Arts, Performance and Identity after Nam June Paik, Nam June Paik Conference, FACT and Tate Liverpool, Friday 18 February 2011.

Now published in Far and Wide, Leonardo Electronic Almanac, Volume 19 Issue 5
ISBN: 978-1-906897-21-5   ISSN: 1071-4391
The catalog is a project by Lanfranco Aceti and Omar Kholeif with the support of FACT.

Filed under: Articles / Texts, , , ,

#ReadingClub #McKenzie Wark #ARPANET dialogues

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Organised with Furtherfield two online performance sessions of the Reading Club
8pm London time

October 21st
Session  based on a chunk of A Hacker Manifesto by McKenzie Wark.[version 4.0]
with Aileen Derieg, Cornelia SollfrankDmytri Kleiner and Marc Garrett.
Recording and chatlog :
Hacking – The Hacker Manifesto

October 22nd
Session  based on a part of one of the ARPANET dialogues from 1975 -1976.
with Alessandro Ludovico, Jennifer Chan, Lanfranco Aceti and Ruth Catlow. They reenacted this historic collision in a contemporary context.
Recording and chatlog :
Postinternet is net.art’s undefined bastard child – ARPANET dialogues

Reading Club  proposes a text and an interpretive arena to 4 readers. These readers write together their reading of a text inside the text itself. The audience sees an evolving, cinematographic picture of thoughts and collaborative writing in the making.

Reading Club is

* an intertextual play and an interpretive arena

* a device to explore reading on the web

* a factory of moving texts

* testing (once more) the status of the author

* a place where the public has a voice

More info also in English : readingclub.fr/info

ReadingClub is supported by Dicréam.

Filed under: Collective writing, Performance, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Huis Clos / No Exit – Remediating the Social

Three public preparation sessions / Three performances

Remediating the Social – ELMCIP conference
Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh, in collaboration with New Media Scotland and University College Falmouth

With Annie Abrahams, Ruth Catlow, Ursula EndlicherNicolas Frespech and Igor Stromajer.

The project is a follow-up of Huis Clos / No Exit – On Translation presented on 29/05/2010 at NIMk in Amsterdam.

This time the preparations for the performances are public.
Via huisclos.mosaika.tv you can see us. You can comment, do suggestions, give ideas in a separate chatwindow.

Preparation as Performance
Preparation 1  :  25 October 6pm GMT
Preparation 2  :  2 November 2pm GMT (find you local time)
Preparation 3  :  3 November 2pm GMT (find you local time)

Performances :
1 November 8pm GMT
A networked performance Exposition on the New Aesthetic
Edinburgh College of Art

free entrance without reservation
Online huisclos.mosaika.tv>(find you local time)

2 and 3 November 3.30pm GMT
Edinburgh College of Art

streaming interface Ivan Chabanaud mosaika.tv
technical assistance Jan de Weille

Will we choose to use more or even less rules? Will we need a leader or continue without one? Maybe Ruth will become a leader naturally because she is only one authorized to use English, the language understood by all. What can we share? How can we position ourselves? What kind of voice will be possible?

More information including an image and a .pdf of the first preparation session : bram.org/huisclos/beyond
Information en français.

25/10/2012 5pm, email to performers :

Remember
Never panic. Nothing can go wrong.
Even if all but you disappear the performance goes on, the others will come back.
Networks are fragile.

What will we do :
Work together to get an idea for the performance of next Thursday (when we will only speak our mother tongues)
Decide together what we will do next Thursday, when there is an official ELMCIP performance announced and to be executed in front of the conference public.
Today we are allowed to speak English.

5 min VideoCollage of the final 3 performances (70 min)
I – Exposition on the New Aesthetic.
II – Newer Aesthetic.
III – The internet is not as good as it was yesterday.

Filed under: Performance, , , , , , , , , ,

Huis Clos/ No Exit – On Translation – documentation

… It felt like touching upon and establishing an early grammar of this new – our  – language… and improvising on it…” Ursula Endlicher.

…I am excluded from future conversations with the others by my own mono-cultural being and perspective. It is not the same as being deaf though, more like aphasia. The fact that I don’t understand the others’ words sensitises me to the tone and timbre of their voices- taps into a more emotional part of me. I feel like a teenager…” Ruth Catlow.

…We reveal … what I call a connected world finally disconnected!” Nicolas Frespech.

…Where narcissicism becomes kaleidoscopic….” Martine Neddam.

…In a way I found this performance very political: it showed us all the tensions of being both unique and multiple, the difficulties both technical and relational that entails having to invent a common ground that does not erase any particularities...” Bérénice Belpaire.

More reactions by the performers and the public (online and at NIMk), Performance protocol, Photos:
http://bram.org/huisclos/ontranslation
Video:
Short, 8 min version http://vimeo.com/12736847
Long, 30 min version http://vimeo.com/12718851

Ruth has been understood by all, but didn’t understand any one of the others.
Nicolas has been understood by Annie, Ursula and Igor. He only understood Ruth.
Igor wasn’t understood by anyone. He understood us all.
Usula has been understood by Annie and Igor, maybe also Paolo? She understood all but Igor.
Paolo has been understood by Igor and maybe Ursula. He understood all but Igor and Annie?
Anniehas been understood by Igor and Ursula. She understood Nicolas, Ruth and Ursula.

Filed under: Performance, , , , , , , ,

Preparation Huis Clos / No Exit – On Translation

Collective test Tuesday 25 05 6PM online in the Bram.org Salon

preparation Annie Abrahams and Igor Stromajer 25 05

preparation Annie Abrahams and Ursula Endlicher 24 05

Preparation Annie Abrahams and Paolo Cioro 24 05

Testing Annie Abrahams and Ruth Catlow

Nicolas Frespech testing

Vidéo on dailymotion by Nicolas Frespech on his preparation of the performance
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xdf70i_repetition-de-la-performance_creation

All images are from private tests, using Manycam among others.

More information on the performance http://bram.org/huisclos/ontranslation

Filed under: Performance, , , , , , ,

Huis Clos / No Exit – On Translation

Telematic performance with 6 performers
May 29th 2010 8.30 pm

Netherlands Media Art Institute
Keizersgracht 264
1016 EV Amsterdam

Part of the Performmikka Internettikka event curated by Petra Heck
(Performmikka Internettikka link naar Nederlandse tekst)

6 Netartists will challenge one another into collective actions.
What will happen when they will only use their mother tongue and code to communicate?

Annie Abrahams – www.bram.org in Amsterdam (NIMk) will only speak Dutch
Ruth Catlow – www.furtherfield.org in London will only speak English
Paolo Cirio – www.paolocirio.net in London will only speak Italian
Ursula Endlicher – www.ursenal.net in New York will only speak German
Nicolas Frespech – www.frespech.com in Montélimar will only speak French
Igor Stromajer – www.intima.org in Hamburg will only speak Slovenian

Internet streaming in the bram.org salon
Process Guardian : Estelle Senay

Any malfunctioning will be part of the game and must be assumed, never panic.
Nothing can go wrong, all is permitted, we can play but we don’t have to – silence is beautiful.

More information

Français
Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Net art, Performance, , , , , , , , ,

Upcoming

* 4-9/12 Qu(o)i <=> agence <=> Quand Résidence Labo NRV Subsistances, Lyon.

* 29/03 15h30 Online En-semble – Entanglement Training with Antye Greie, Helen Varley Jamieson, Soyung Lee, Hương Ngô, Daniel Pinheiro and Igor Stromajer, Art of the Networked Practice symposium, School of Art, Design & Media, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
* April, Residency Lingagens in Künstlerhaus Villa Waldberta, Feldafing, Germany.

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