net art, video, performance

Annie Abrahams

Displaced – a conversation with Soyung Lee

148_sy-sequence-chi02Displaced by Soyung Lee is the documentation of a performance on the subject of dubbing different languages to explore the concept of social identities. I don’t really understand yet why it touches me so much – of course because it points to communities of people of different backgrounds, different languages, doing things together (Cantonese, English, Mandarin, and Tagalog) – it points to a place where English is not dominant.
Also because it’s made by amateurs and professionals, because it has a beautiful text at its base and because it talks about a very actual condition – the displacement – in a way we can all feel – because it unites me with them, with exiles, refugees, – and because it’s performance, cinema and theater all at once, it’s hybrid.

After having written a short entrance about the project on my e-stranger blog, I wrote Soyung an email with some questions. It was very interesting to read more about the background of her project and so I asked her if I could publish a slightly edited version of our exchange here.

AA: You announce the video on your website as documentation of a performance, but you edited the footing, so, in my opinion it became a video on its own – how do you see this?
SL: Yes, though it was a live performance, I wanted it, from the beginning when I was still planning the project, to also function as a video piece. Hence, I discussed how to document it with the cameraman, Benny, and we edited the multi-camera shots together. The length of the performance didn’t change much – the whole performance was about 11 to 12 min including short pauses between the scenes. I also thought about shooting the whole thing as a video series instead of a performance series, in which case, I could have controlled the details better by reshooting. But in the end, I preferred to try live dubbing when the performers speak in front of the audience.
For this piece, I didn’t change or edit too much since I wanted to keep the original flow of the performance. Usually, I take a much longer time editing and changing the order and playing with the rhythm when it’s video.

AA: Was the performance done in front of a public? As in theater? Is it something you would repeat?
SL: It was done in Cattle Depot Artist Village in Hong Kong in front of about 40-50 people. This site is a former cattle slaughter and under the care of the HK government. The residency (Videotage Fuse Residency) office was inside the village, and the first day I visited, I loved the backdrop of this setting.
I would like to repeat this performance, possibly in a theater, but with some changes in the script since this one is particularly related to Hong Kong’s current situations (see a bit further in this exchange), possibly in another country with diverse cultural codes.

AA: The numbers with the music, cuts up the performance in parts, makes it existing out of different scenes and so the result gets something from theater or cinema too – was there an equivalent in the performance or was the performance one event and did you change, edit it like this it later?
SL: I continue to experiment on how to incorporate or put layers that relate to cinema, theater, and performance in a single piece.
I’m interested in mixing professionals and non-professionals (usually migrant workers or minority groups) for I want the social misfits to be performers (not subjects) in my work.

AA: And why numbers?
SL: It might have been one of the easiest choices, I think now.  The script was written in 7 scenes. I do however think that I could have maybe used dates or other time breaks in between the scenes. Something to consider for the next piece.

AA: Why did you choose these particular languages? Because that’s what the performers spoke? And – did they all understand the four languages?
SL: I used Cantonese (that’s what the male actor, Donald, spoke) because it’s the main language Hong Kong people use. They are under the heavy pressure from China to use Mandarin in schools, so, people are afraid to lose Cantonese. The Filipino ladies – Marita, Merz, and Ever – who are domestic helpers in HK spoke Tagalog which is the most largely used language in the Philippines. The Hong Kong  actress, Cha, spoke Mandarin for some of the lines as she also speaks Mandarin reflecting HK’s current language shift from Cantonese and English to Mandarin. The Canadian performer, Kristy lives already for eight years in Hong Kong and works in Hong Kong Disneyland performing as Disney characters (usually princesses). Though she’s more interested in doing non-commercial performances, because of her visa. I very much enjoyed collaborating with all of them.
They didn’t understand all four languages and neither did I. All the meetings and workshops were held in English. I also discovered that written Cantonese and spoken Cantonese are quite different, so the subtitles and the spoken Cantonese were two different versions of translation.

AA: I adore your text, it’s strangeness, “directness”, emotion, humanity – just very curious – How, when did you write it? Do you write more? Can I find something more …
SL: Thank you. My residency period lasted about 2 and a half month, and I wrote the script after a month of researching in Hong Kong. There are about 320,000 domestic workers in Hong Kong (around 3 percent of Hong Kong’s population in 2013, according to South China Morning Post). Filipinos are the largest number reported to be the 50 percent of them. On the weekends, when they’re off work, they are out in parks and near subway stations because they need to be (or like to be) out of the houses when the families stay together. These ladies take care of the babies, house chores, and sometimes teach English to young kids. I also went to some interesting places in Hong Kong, such as horse races where majority of the crowd watching games seemed to be 50 and above white male and a couple of small islands where the local natives and foreigners live together. All of these scenes registered in mind before I started writing.
Korea is a developed country especially in terms of technology and fast wiring system of the Internet, but we are not quite multi-cultured. Most people speak Korean only, and though there are foreigners and migrant workers, they are not strongly recognizable as a part of Korean culture yet. Similarly, in Korea, people understand the concept of minority but most people don’t seem to capture how it feels to be a minority.
In such cities as Hong Kong, there are more layers in culture and languages, and that inspired me to write this piece.(1)
I also wanted to adapt a few lines from internationally popular novels and plays originally written in Chinese, Russian, and English. (2)
For other writings, I do write usually related to my video pieces or to the research projects. The last script I’ve written for the piece, “Fortress,” was more abstractly written in the very beginning with blank spaces for the actors to fill in. After several meetings and workshops, I added more lines and guidelines but still, the scenes that each actor talked about the idea of dream home and death are filmed with their improvised lines. A few of my colleagues, to whom I sent the original text, liked the first draft of the script, but I wanted to have the actors tell their own concept of “home” in their style of talking.

AA: Could you have made this piece before the internet area, before we all got connected by technology?
SL: I think, since you’ve asked this question, I started realizing how the Internet might have influenced making this piece because before this new era of viewing so much contents of media by streaming or downloading via youtube, vimeo, etc, translating languages and discovering media contents were much slower, and the multi-culture or multi-languages didn’t seem to happen simultaneously. Nowadays, we seem to be more okay with hearing different languages and became familiar with sounds of different languages other than our own or English(or Latin based languages). At the same time, an older media technique which is still quite commonly used such as dubbing technique became more intriguing for me in a sense why and how we can still use it as well as how we can distort such techniques for provoking different kinds discussions as what’s hidden in cracks and pausing moments.

(1) AA: I have a very personal question : Why are you so interested in the exile, the minority? Are you part of one?
SL: I went to the US when I was 14 and lived there for about 10 years as a minority. That was a big jump from a relatively comfortable identity to a very conflicted and confused one. I also had conversations with my Korean-American cousins and other minority friends about being misfits in communities. Then, I lived in London for about 6 months and returned to Korea. When I returned to where I once believed home, there were some other uneasiness in culture that I encountered. Spending a couple of years doing a research-based project on Korean diasporas in Central Asia also made me think a lot about resettlement. Though there are disturbing experiences and conflicts I sometimes include or mention in the work, my direction is towards the possibilities in migration and resettlement in the history of diasporas. The possibilities of sewing the conflicting identities together interest me and inspire some of the projects I’ve been working on and plan to produce.

(2) AA: In your text I only recognized Gertrud Stein and maybe something Shakespearean. The phrase of “the children never having eaten men” struck me as a citation too, but ….
SL: The plays and novels I used for the texts are: Romeo and Juliet  by William Shakespeare, Diary of a Madman by Nikolai V. Gogol, and A Madman’s Diary by Lu Xun.

Scene 3:
“Deny thy father and refuse thy name; or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, and I’ll no longer be a (Ponce)(3). ’Tis but thy name that is my enemy; thou art thyself, though not a (Chun)(3). What’s (Chun)(3)? It is nor hand, nor foot, nor arm, nor face, nor any other part belonging to a man. O, be some other name!”
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet… doff thy name, and for that name which is no part of thee Take all myself.”
(Quoted from: Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, Act II Scene II)
Scene 4:
“I have discovered that China and Spain are really one and the same country, and it’s only ignorance that leads people to think that they’re two different nations. If you don’t believe me, then try and write ‘Spain’ and you’ll end up writing ‘China’.”
(Quoted from: Diary of a Madman by Nikolai V. Gogol, p.193 in Madrid, 30th Februarius)
Scene 6:
“Perhaps there are still children who have not eaten men?”
“Save the children…”
(
Quoted from: A Madman’s Diary by Lu Xun)

I adapted from the writers who are internationally popular in literature and theatre and from the countries that are largely influential to Asian culture, so some people (especially from the theatre background) can acknowledge them. The universality and adaptability of the performance was also important when I wrote the script.
The balcony scene of the Romeo and Juliet was adapted because I had an interesting discussion with some Hong Kong friends and the Canadian performer, Kristy, about the names in Hong Kong. Since Hong Kong used to be a British colony, most people have English names. Some of them are typical or old English names, but some of the names are direct and unique such as “Emotion, Dream,” etc. Now the young generations in HK are fighting for democracy against pro-China government, and as a foreigner, the complexity of their culture even in the names seemed very interesting.

(3) AA: What is in the names Chun and Ponce that is interesting to you, what do they mean?
SL: I wanted to use one of the most popular Chinese or Cantonese last names, and Chun was one of them. Ponce is the last name of Merz, one of the Filipino performers, who starts dubbing the first line of the balcony scene.

AA: Thank you so much Soyung for this generous and insightful conversation.

Filed under: Articles / Texts, Of interest, , , , , , ,

besides, compressed … video, script


(©Dina Lucia Weiss)

“We falsely equate the audience with the public instead of always viewing it as separate from the public, as something by means of which we temporarily leave the public outside and rehearse new adventures in how to be together through being separated.”

The first phrase of the performance besides, compressed by communication (On Object Agency), that Martina Ruhsam and I did last Saturday online and Im Flieger* in Vienna, was a citation from Bojana Kunst’s book Artist at Work. The last phrase was a variation on Hito Steyerl’s How Not to be Seen: A Fucking Didactic Educational .MOV File.

Here is the video of the screen recording (35 min) :

The complete text / script where we based the performance on and the logfile of the online chat are available from bram.org/besides

“We perform experimenting thinking together using words and things and the affects transferred via our voices. We experiment performing thinking together, We think performing experiments together, We experiment thinking performance, We experiment performing thought together using words and things and the affects transferred via our voices…” Extract from “besides, what are we doing ?” Notes on the performance series, 03 2016.

* In the frame of Stoffwechsel – Ökologien der Zusammenarbeit.

Filed under: networked performance, Performance, Video, , , ,

besides, compressed by communication

besidesImFlieger

besides, compressed by communication
Performance with Martina Ruhsam
March 19th 20h
Duration 30 – 40 minutes with discussion afterwards

Im_Flieger,
Im_flieger@Schokoladenfabrik, Gaudenzdorfergürtel 43–45/4. Stock/4C, 1120 Wien (U4 Margaretengürtel) >> map
Pay as you wish

To assist online go to water-wheel.net a little bit before 20h and click ENTER (please be patient, you might have to wait a few minutes before it will be working)

In the frame of Metabolism – Ecologies of collaboration (project & platform).
Stoffwechsel – Ökologien der Zusammenarbeit ist ein transmediales Forschungsprojekt mit unterschiedlich involvierten Künstler_innen und Theoretiker_innen und experimentiert mit strukturellen und künstlerischen Verschränkungen.

Im_Flieger is an Independent Artists’ Association – Platform and Experimental Ground for Dance, Performance and related Art Forms.

A real-time composition in which daily objects interrelate in an interface that usually frames the heads of humans. Annie Abrahams (In Montpellier) and Martina Ruhsam (in Wien) communicate by juxtaposing and resituating objects and by reading a text that is recomposed during the course of the performance. Unexpected links between thing and thing, object and text, image and sound appear. Sometimes the inorganic performers hijack the discussion. Scissors meet a knife which coincides with the word capitalism before being replaced by a little white box that is temporarily allied with anonymity. While matches and a paperbag are visible, a discussion about being post-image takes place, followed by the inorganic pulsations of a plastic nose and a plastic bag. The conversation meanders through unpredictable territories and is disseminated among various human and nonhuman agents.

We perform experimenting thinking together using words and things and the affects transferred via our voices. We experiment performing thinking together using words and things and the affects transferred via our voices. We think performing experiments together, We experiment thinking performance together, We experiment performing thought … citation from besides, what are we doing ? Notes on the performance series, 03 2016, Annie Abrahams

besides,not

Filed under: Performance, , , ,

Distant Feeling(s) – séance #1

Distant Feeling(s) 17min35 Edited video available for projection, installation, exhibition. Contact landv0dotproject@gmail.com or bramdotorg@gmail.com

March, 4 2016.
Daniel Pinheiro in Porto, Annie Abrahams in Montpellier and Lisa Parra in New York  tried to experience the others presence online with eyes closed and no talking.

Meeting Lisa and Daniel.
Yes we met. In space. Where? In my body maybe?
I was trying to much. Maybe. Why did I look more up than down? Was there, where we were, more up in the sky than here down? I was imagining I might be able to provoke an action, a telematic coordination of movement. It didn’t happen. Slowly I went from the outside to the inside. I was with them on the floor of Lisa’s dance studio. I could feel them. Bullshit of course. There was nothing to say when we opened our eyes.
I would like to do it again, I would like to see what would happen a second time.
Was Lisa crying near the end?”
Annie Abrahams

“I did cry.
I too was imaging myself lying on the floor. it was an inner journey of images, desires, dreams, feelings of sadness and happiness
it was special, it was a special moment in time.” – Lisa Parra

“It made me think of meeting strangers inside an elevator that gets stucked. Where my mind traveled many places trying to understand where was I in relation to these other two persons. Were they there still?! The urge to open my eyes was suddenly erased by the warmth of the sun in my face… here… and back to them … there.
it constantly made me feel that I was there because they were also there, suddenly instead of facing them it was about these three silent bodies “looking” at something else.
the intimate space of silence is awkward. the absence of time and space is endless and infinite”
 – Daniel Pinheiro

More reflections, a video screencapture – raw and score here.

Lisa Parra is a choreographer, performer and video artist.
Daniel Pinheiro is a media artist and performer.
Annie Abrahams is a net artist and performer.

Filed under: networked performance, Video, , , ,

The Personal & the Politics of Language

fragile

Gretta Louw reviews Abrahams’ book from estranger to e-stranger: Living in between languages, and finds that not only does it demonstrate a brilliant history in performance art, but, it is also a sharp and poetic critique about language and everyday culture.

The Personal & the Politics of Language: Digital Colonialism & Annie Abrahams’ (E)stranger
Review by Gretta Louw on Furtherfield, 08/03/2016.

from estranger to e-stranger is an almost dadaist, associative, yet powerful interrogation of the accepted wisdoms, the supposed logic of language, and the power structures that it is routinely co-opted into enforcing.

Abrahams’ project is timely, especially now that we are all (supposedly) living in an infinitely connected, post-cultural/post-national, online society, we are literally “living between languages”. The book is an excellent resource, because it is not a coherent, textual presentation of a thesis; of one way of thinking. It is, like the true face of the internet, a collection, a sample, of various thoughts, opinions, ideas, and examples from the past.

Filed under: Articles / Texts, , , , , ,

besides, what are we doing?

light

We started out with three very different meetings (See turbulence.org) and then decided to continue to explore one of them further; we restricted ourselves to a theme and made the project on “meeting online =” also a research on the relation between objects/things, text and the voice.
We began experiencing and experimenting the performances as an other method of thinking together about both object agency and online collaboration.

– We stage a collaborative performance project online.
– Meeting online =
– We are meeting online, trying to get more grip on what is actually happening in online webcam communication.
– This is a research project where we use performance as a tool.
– Using performance as a tool, is a way to create a common responsibility.
– We use an interface which doesn’t permit that either of us two can become dominant, an interface that has flaws, glitches, bugs, an interface that cannot be domesticated.
– We are not developing a performance – our performances are part of a research process.
My performances are a research tool, not an object ansich, not something to show off. (See allergic-to-utopias)

But the audience? Why should they be interested, What is it for them? They can think with us!

So far :
besides, the person I am becoming 1/06 2015
There are :
the interface : two webcam images side by side, one managed by Martina, one by Annie. Both images have exactly the same size and presence there is no power relation.
– a text
: a remix, done together, of phrases read and heard, collected over one month by Annie and Martina individually. We determined before who would read what part of the text.
objects : things : we will not use personal objects, things with a very specific personal history and they should not be too beautiful, as ordinary, casual, daily as possible.
What did we mean by that, why? We didn’t want things to be symbols. We almost entirely excluded also natural objects as flowers, leafs etc., because, they are already alive on their own and so are too symbolically loaded too.
The objects were placed in front of the webcam at before undetermined intervals.
the hands : hands who lay down the objects carefully.
two voices : as neutral as possible. Because the interface merges the sound of both webcams in one stream, there is no way for the audience to distinguish if a voice comes from the one or from the other webcam. They can only hear that there are two different voices, there is a dialogue.

What dialogue? Who is talking to who, who is addressed? Who receives? The objects replace the faces we are used to see in webcam images. We see them in close up – they become actors – we can believe them to be intimate, to have a relation. They too have a / are in dialogue. They too are elements being in the event. (1)

This is where the two subjects meet. This is where we meet.

In besides, the city is not a tree, 22/07 2015 we used a different, more narrative, mix of the same text collection. We decided to abandon the neutral voice and let the exchange be more natural allowing for affect to transpire (2). We speeded the rhythm and alternations.
Hands should be just careful installers, shouldn’t manipulate, nor stay too long in the frame.
For besides, smaller than a single pixel 28/11 2015 we made a new text collection. No natural objects at all were allowed anymore. Would the perceived agency of the thing change if we would enter and exit them at specific moments in the text? If we stopped talking while changing the objects? Would the objects become more present, have more influence if we allowed for moments without text?
We stayed with speaking the text in an ordinary manner. Would the dialogue be more fluent if we decided to use the texts fragments randomly? Would that give more dialogical power to our voices and rhythm? Would that help us to use text and objects equally in our perform thinking experience?

We perform experimenting thinking together using words and things and the affects transferred via our voices. We experiment performing thinking together using words and things and the affects transferred via our voices. We think performing experiments together, We experiment thinking performance together, We experiment performing thought …

(1) “According to Bakhtin, in order to ‘overcome’ the separation and opposition between art and life, between art and culture, the elaboration of a ‘first philosophy’ is required: The philosophy of event-being. Art and life cannot and must not tend towards identification, as was the case with the Situationists, for example. But, in order that the enriching, excessive and productive difference between art and life be able to express itself, it is necessary to possess a theory which, whilst maintaining the irreducible differences between these two dimensions, articulates them in the achievement of the event.” Maurizio Lazzarato in Dialogism and Polyphony. geocities.ws/immateriallabour/lazzarato-dialogism-and-polyphony.html
(2) “According to Bakhtin, the voice or intonation, not yet captured in the ‘phonetic abstraction’ of language, is always produced ‘on the threshold of the verbal and the non-verbal, the said and the non-said’ and it is through it that it addresses itself to the other. This address is affective and ethico-political rather than linguistic. It ‘appropriates, travels, avails itself of linguistic and semiotic elements, confirms and drifts away, critiques and legitimates meanings and established intonations’. ……………It is only when the voice penetrates and appropriates words and statements that the latter loose their linguistic potentiality and turn into actualised expression. It is only at that moment that words and statements are encumbered with the a unique and non reproducible role in verbal exchange.” Maurizio Lazzarato generation-online.org/p/fp_lazzarato6.htm

Notes on performance series besides, with Martina Ruhsam, 03 2016, Annie Abrahams

Filed under: Performance, , , , , , , , ,

Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 3

screen-shot-2016-02-18-at-8-52-51-pm-1024x636

Reading Club (2013 – ….) included in
Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 3.

The result is a material representation of the reader’s presence in the text. As the readers type, cut and paste, delete, format, and transform the text, the text becomes a conversational space in which read not just the text but each other’s interventions, guessing each other’s goals as they collaborate, riff, joust, and subvert each other.

February 2016, Cambridge, Massachusetts: Electronic Literature Organization, ISSN: 1932-2016.
Editors : Stephanie Boluk, Jacob Garbe, Anastasia Salter, and Leonardo Flores.

Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 3. 1.0 – Launched February 18, 2016. The core ELC3, complete with works and editorial commentary, launched at the “Matter of Bits” exhibition at Rutgers University Camden. This first iteration is online-only and links to live versions of works currently available on the web, whenever possible.

Filed under: e-literature, Edition, , , ,

unaussprechbarlich

A bulb, alleine mit die Sprache, immer die Sprache, Sprache im Kopf …

Kein …. recul, keine Ablösung
Die Konzentration
Gabel, Messer und Vogel
Gabel, Messer und Vogel
Eendjes op het water. Alles kan verdwijnen.
Kein Anker, Geister…

From October 31 till December 23rd 2015 I have been living in Villa Waldberta (Feldafing, Germany). In this period I worked with Helen Varley Jamieson on a project called unaussprechbarlich. We researched the difficulties and joys of communicating in a language that’s not our mothertongue: German.
Information for the performance we wanted to develop was accumulated on unaussprechbarlich.tumblr.com. Anecdotes, academic reflexions, personal stories, literature, artworks, text, text text.

After a try out at Villa Waldberta we did performances in Schwere-Reiter‘s Probaraum (December 4rd) and in Lothringer13‘s Rroom (December 9th).

23817090692_929a05c30d_z23298592303_aec6c07379_z
More images: flickr.com/photos/bramorg/sets/72157662022985469

Helen was sitting at a table where she had two computers, two videoprojectors, a webcam, books and writing material. I was sitting amidst the public. The public heard Helen teaching herself German swearwords (Arschloch, Bergaufbremser) using an online guide to pronounciation (forvo.de). After 5 minutes I started singing Vader Jacob. followed by a personal story (in German) about my experiences with language learning. In the mean time Helen wrote German words related to the news on a paper by hand. This was projected. After my story I went to the microphone and read excerpts of Julia Kristeva’s book Etrangers à nous-mêmes in French. Helen transcribed this text in German in an online translation window, that was projected. The public read the text and the English translation at the same time. When finished Helen started to correct the text. I yelled: a loud cry. Helen continued, I went to a corner, turned my back to the public and started singing a definition of monolinguism ….

This describes the first 20 minutes. If you want to know more here are the Performance Script and Wall Texts in a .pdf.

Here is feedback on the third performance by Christina Maria Pfeifer.

Filed under: Performance, , , , ,

placelessness

Invited by Lisa Parra for the preparation of Land Project: Placelessness,  I participated in an online performance experiment on the  30th of October 2015.

Placelessness is the result of a residency of Lisa and Daniel Pinheiro at CAAA – Centre for Art and Architecture Affairs, in Guimarães (Portugal).

Are you here? Yes, I think so.

We had a very moving 6 minutes of “distanced feeling” :

AnnieLisa

Follow-up : Distant Feeling(s) with Lisa Parra and Daniel Pinheiro.

Filed under: networked performance, Performance, , , ,

Gender Dissent across Mediated Literary Works

adalogoRule-guided Expression: Gender Dissent across Mediated Literary Works by Kristin Allukian and Mauro Carassai.

Published in Ada Issue #8. Ada is a journal of gender new media and technology.

“This paper is concerned with the examination of rule-guided cultural and thematic battles enacted by women writers in two historical moments—the late nineteenth- and early twenty-first centuries—against the dominant cultural institutions of their time. Such battles, evaluated in the Anglophone world of letters at large, bring to light women’s often inconspicuous strategies for legislating new mechanisms of written expression within the established authoring and reading practices of their times.

Both the mobility-limited late nineteenth century society and the apparently digitally-democratized twenty-first century seem to call for female writing subjects, who are often seen at the margins of the “social factory,”to intervene through specific literary acts of disturbance. Such acts of disturbance, when closely analyzed, can be seen as both exposing and altering the rule-based systems in which these authors are confrontationally embedded.

……

In envisioning the routes of such processes of imagination-based social practices moving from the ideally American radiating center, Dutch e-literature author Annie Abrahams, who has been living in France since 1987, and Australian codework poet Mary-Anne Breeze (also known as Mez) can be seen as modern Anglophone literary catalysts of the instances of the previously discussed nineteenth-century American writers such as Alcott, Phelps, Blake, and Jewett in a world increasingly imposing norms and standards both in digital labor and language-based technological expressions. Our brief analysis of works such as Abrahams’s Separation/Séparation or Mez’s _cross.ova.ing 4rm.blog.2.log 07/08 highlights how female electronic writing seems both to update the abovementioned three elements detected in the women’s career literature and translate them into the pragmatic dimension of digitally-mediated language expression.”

Filed under: Articles / Texts, Net art, , , , , ,

Upcoming

* 7/06-23/06 Résidence Itérations Constant association for art and media, Bruxelles and ESC medien kunst labor, Graz.
Exposition Imal Bruxelles 23/06/ - 31/07/2016
* 7-8/07 besides, subjectivity is no longer a privileged site for emancipation Performance in the conference The Politics of Performance and Play. Feminist Matters. Institute of philosophy, University of Leiden.

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